Research Projects

2013 - present
Smart Data Innovation Lab (SDIL)
Role: Co-Lead of the data Innovation community "Personalised Medicine"
[ Project Webpage ]
Short Description:
Data are the oil of the 21st century - This frequently quoted slogan is an excellent metaphor for describing the fundamental change triggered by the growing “Data Economy”. What are the ramifications for Germany and Europe? Germany has traditionally been a country of engineers, and is a global leader in Mechanical and Electrical Engineering. Now, engineering needs to be extended to also accommodate “Digital Data Engineering”. Once we understand “Data Engineering” as a significant added competitive edge, we will not only be able to maintain our globally leading position, but to even strengthen it. In order to achieve this, important research effort still needs to be made, e.g. in terms of real-time processing of large data quantities (“Big Data”). Structuring Big Data results in information (called “Smart Data”) which in turn leads to knowledge advantages which can be used to support decision-making processes. In order to be able to make fast use of this competitive edge for Europe, partners from industry and research have set themselves the goal to bring to life the Smart Data Innovation Lab. The close cooperation between industry and science is intended to improve the conditions for cutting-edge research in the area of Data Engineering / Smart Data“
2011 - 2013
European Data Infrastructure (EUDAT)
Role: Task Force Leader "Safe Data Replication"
[ Project Webpage ]
Short Description:
In recent years, significant investments have been made by the European Commission and European member states to create a pan-European e-infrastructure supporting multiple research communities. As a result, a European e-infrastructure ecosystem is currently taking shape, with communication networks, distributed grids and HPC facilities providing European researchers from all fields with state-of-the-art instruments and services that support the deployment of new research facilities on a pan-European level. However, the accelerated proliferation of data – newly available from powerful new scientific instruments, simulations and digitization of library resources –, has created a new impetus for increasing efforts and investments in order to tackle the specific challenges of data management, and to ensure a coherent approach to research data access and preservation. EUDAT aims to address these challenges and exploit new opportunities using its vision of a Collaborative Data Infrastructure.
2011 - present
Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE)
Role: XSEDE IT Architect
[ Project Webpage ]
Short Description:
The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) is the most advanced, powerful, and robust collection of integrated advanced digital resources and services in the world. It is a single virtual system that scientists can use to interactively share computing resources, data, and expertise. Scientists and engineers around the world use these resources and services—things like supercomputers, collections of data, and new tools—to make our lives healthier, safer, and better. XSEDE, and the experts who lead the program, will make these resources easier to use and help more people use them. Find out more about what scientists will do with the XSEDE infrastructure. The five-year, $121-million project is supported by the National Science Foundation. It replaces and expands on the NSF TeraGrid project. More than 10,000 scientists used the TeraGrid to complete thousands of research projects, at no cost to the scientists. That same sort of work—only in more detail, generating more new knowledge and improving our world in an even broader range of fields—continues with XSEDE. Find out how to get an allocation to use XSEDE resources. XSEDE lowers technological barriers to the access and use of computing resources. Using XSEDE, researchers can establish private, secure environments that have all the resources, services, and collaboration support they need to be productive. Find out more about the resources and services available through XSEDE. Initially, XSEDE supports 16 supercomputers and high-end visualization and data analysis resources across the country. It also includes other specialized digital resources and services to complement these computers. These resources will be expanded throughout the lifetime of the project. The XSEDE partnership includes: University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Carnegie Mellon University/University of Pittsburgh, University of Texas at Austin, University of Tennessee Knoxville, University of Virginia, Shodor Education Foundation, Southeastern Universities Research Association, University of Chicago, University of California San Diego, Indiana University, Jülich Supercomputing Centre, Purdue University, Cornell University, Ohio State University, University of California Berkeley, Rice University, and the National Center for Atmospheric Research. It is led by the University of Illinois's National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA).
2010 - 2013
European Middleware Initiative (EMI)
Role: EMI Strategic Director
[ Project Webpage ]
Short Description:
European Middleware Initiative (EMI) is a software platform for high performance distributed computing. It is at the core of grid middleware distributions used by scientific research communities and distributed computing infrastructures all over the world including WLCG--the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid--which supports, for example, the search for the Higgs boson and new types of matter searches of the physicists at LHC, together with other large scientific challenges in astronomy, biology, computational chemistry and other sciences. Being a close collaboration among well-established grid middleware providers (i.e. ARC, gLite, UNICORE, dCache) and other specialized software providers, EMI proposes itself as a leading platform for scientific grid computing and looks at expanding outside of its natural environment.
2008 - 2010
Distributed European Infrastructure for Supercomputing Applications (DEISA)
Role: Expert for Interoperability and Open Standards
[ Project Webpage ]
Short Description:
DEISA, the Distributed European Infrastructure for Supercomputing Applications, is a consortium of leading national Supercomputing centres that aims at fostering the pan-European world-leading computational science research. DEISA deploys and operates a persistent, production quality, distributed supercomputing environment with continental scope. It aims at delivering a turnkey opera­tional solution for a future European HPC eco­system. And by extending the European collaborative environment in the area of supercomputing, DEISA is paving the way towards the deployment and operation of a persistent cooperative European HPC ecosystem, as suggested by ESFRI.
2006 - 2008
Open Middleware Infrastructure Institute for Europe (OMII - Europe)
Role: Expert for Infrastructure Integration and Application Interoperability
[ Project Webpage ]
Short Description:
The Open Middleware Infrastructure Institute for Europe (OMII-Europe) has been established to provide key software components for building e-Infrastructures within the European Research Area (ERA). The initial focus for OMII-Europe is to facilitate the development and porting of a common set of application level services to a number of major Grid software distributions, and further to develop tighter interoperability between different Grid distributions. This will provide greater application level portability and will thus simplify the use of Grids, especially when those Grids are built on heterogeneous infrastructures. Many of the major Grid software providers such as EGEE, UNICORE, Globus and CROWNGrid are working with OMII-Europe to achieve these goals in a standardscompliant and open-source manner. OMII-Europe will develop and maintain a repository of quality-assured Grid services that have been reengineered and sourced from existing open source repositories. Central to OMII-Europe is Quality Assurance. All OMII-Europe-endorsed software components will undergo rigorous testing following a quality assurance methodology published by OMII-Europe. OMII-Europe positions itself as an impartial broker for potential users of key middleware platforms providing impartial, unbiased advice and services. In line with this, OMII-Europe will initiate development of a Grid benchmarking methodology and publish results on a number of major Grid distributions. This benchmark suite will be made available to the community and OMII-Europe will encourage community benchmark contributions.
2004 - 2006
Uniform Interface to Grid Services (UniGrids)
Role: Leader of Standardization Activities
[ Project Webpage ]
Short Description:
The UniGridS project will develop a Grid Service infrastructure compliant with the Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA). It is based on the UNICORE Grid software initially developed in the German UNICORE and UNICORE Plus projects and extended in the EU funded EUROGRID and GRIP projects. These demonstrated the development of an effective Grid, the use of applications in a Grid environment and the interoperability between the Globus Toolkit 2 and UNICORE. The guiding principle of the project will be both to adopt and to influence standards in key project areas. Additional generic software components for visualisation and steering of simulations, remote device monitoring and control will be developed to broaden the applicability of Grid computing to new scientific and technological areas. Access to distributed data and databases will be integrated from previous European Grid projects. A framework for quality of service and service level agreements will be designed to meet the requirements of industrial and business communities. Dynamic virtual organisations will be supported by enhancing the UNICORE security infrastructure to allow different usage models such as delegation and collective authentication. UniGridS will develop translation mechanisms, such as resource ontologies, to interoperate with other OGSA compliant systems. At the same time UniGridS will target Grid economics by developing a SLA framework and cross-Grid brokering services. The project developments will be proven in scientific and industrial domains, namely biomolecular and computational biology, and geophysical depth imaging by oil companies. The UniGridS project will cooperate with other European projects, particularly Integrated Projects in FP6. It will make its results available to them on a timely basis and solicit their requirements to influence the software development process.
2004 - 2005
German National Grid Integration Project (D-Grid DGI)
Role: SW - Engineer
[ Project Webpage ]
Short Description:
The D-Grid Initiative aims to integrate applications from a broad range of areas and communities. For this reason, the BMBF has funded efforts from highly different disciplines: D-Grid currently comprises more than 20 projects with over 100 partners (excluding the projects from the upcoming Third Call for Participation). Additionally, several other institutions have been provided with special grants for provisioning computing and data resources to the whole D-Grid project and user community in order to ensure uninterrupted operation of the project-specific facilities.